Meet

Kara

Meet

Kara

Experience

Kara graduated with a B.S. in dietetics from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2014 and a M.S. in medical nutrition from the University of Nebraska Medical Center in 2016. Her experience includes providing nutrition care in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. Kara has extensive experience working with a wide variety of health conditions and disease states.

Whether for chronic disease management or general health and wellbeing, Kara has a passion for helping clients meet their health goals while fostering a positive relationship with food. 

About Kara

My nutrition philosophy is simple: Nutrition, not restriction. Nutrition can be a powerful tool for optimizing health. However, too often we’re told what not to eat, what to eat less of or how to limit what we eat. Focusing on food rules and restrictions is typically unhelpful and even harmful in many situations. Health is complex. Nutrition is complex. We are all unique with our own personal goals, values, needs, strengths and challenges. Through a whole-person centered approach, we will work together to develop a nutrition plan that takes your unique circumstances into consideration. I will support you in nourishing your body in a way that allows you to feel your best physically, mentally and emotionally. My approach is free from food rules and restrictions, allowing you to break free from food guilt, stress and overwhelm. My goal is to help you meet your health goals while also prioritizing a positive relationship with food. If focusing on health and wellbeing is something you want to do, I’m here to support you by providing compassionate, individualized, evidence-based nutrition care. 

A little bit about me: 

I have loved food for as long as I can remember. My mom fostered this love with her time and patience teaching me to bake and cook. I learned about gardening from my dad and gained a deeper appreciation for food by seeing the hard work and dedication required to run the family farm. When I learned that I could pursue a career that combined food, science and helping others, I was instantly sold. Learning about nutrition science, human metabolism and medical nutrition therapy was fascinating. However, during my college years my joy for food slowly vanished. Among other societal pressures, I believed I needed to “eat perfectly” if I was going to be a dietitian. As it turns out, there isn’t a perfect way to eat. All I gained in my pursuit of eating perfectly was an unhealthy fixation on food, some disordered eating behaviors and increased guilt and shame. 

 It wasn’t until after I graduated and started reading about intuitive eating and the effects of chronic dieting and diet culture that I fully recognized why my joy for food had disappeared. This allowed me to heal my own relationship with food and to make food and eating enjoyable again. My personal experiences completely changed my professional perspective. I’m not here to be the “food police” or pass judgment. I believe food should be enjoyable because after all, we can’t live without it. It is vitally important to me to help those I work with enjoy food, not fear it.

Sincerely,

Kara